I've been training in the SF Bay Area since late 2016 and by now, I :

(a) have finally developed a personal shot sequence that works.

(b) shoot decent, tight groups with six arrow ends @ 10 yards, indoors.

(c) am relieved that my sessions no longer conclude with deep constellations of bruises across my bow arm. (See (a))

(d) just moved up to shooting three arrow ends @ 20 yards, indoors. The athlete's equivalent of stage fright is finally gone (and the long rod and sight I added may have helped with that.) 

I am guided by the words of wisdom and stern talking-to's from award-winning archer, coach and spirit guide Nico Gallegos, the owner-operator of fantastic Ohlone Archery. More than just a range, Nico has created a close, supportive community of local archers in an environment where you get better proportionately to the ends you're willing to lob at targets for hours at a time.

Archery has been the ultimate practice of mindfulness and I have the aching arms and shoulder blades to show for it.

 

  Practicing on the shop bow in e rarely empty shop.

Practicing on the shop bow in e rarely empty shop.


 Really enamored with this cover for some reason.  In my mind this is Huntington Beach Pier and ice cream costs less than $5 a scoop.

Really enamored with this cover for some reason.  In my mind this is Huntington Beach Pier and ice cream costs less than $5 a scoop.


Bo Knows... Archery

Just watched an incredible documentary on the late 1980s powerhouse that was Bo Jackson in the fantastic ESPN series 30 for 30

This Heisman Trophy winner at Auburn University would become the only pro athlete to become an All Star in two sports: football with the LA Raiders and baseball with the Kansas City Royals (and later Chicago White Sox). He was a superhuman in both, for his strength (breaking baseball bats over his leg), speed (tearing through walls of linebackers in real live, being Super Mario star level invincible in Tecmo Bowl on the Nintendo NES), and agility (running up an outfield wall to catch a baseball). In the 1980s, you could't get more viral a video than being featured in your own Nike commercial.

 

Jackson also worked out his compound bow skills throughout his pro career and his personal retreat is into his man cave, where he builds arrows under the gaze of all of his game hunting trophies.

  A scene from  ESPN 30 for 30: "You Don't Know Bo"  showing Jackson making bows in his "man cave" with almost zen like focus.

A scene from ESPN 30 for 30: "You Don't Know Bo" showing Jackson making bows in his "man cave" with almost zen like focus.

Just so inspired by a person who pushed himself to dominate two tough sports so handedly, using his grit and determination to sharpen his preternatural athletic gifts. And then finding peace with a bow and arrow.


  Seeking out artificial intelligence, finding statistics, learning about archery.  Low bias, low variance.  Via Pedro Domingos, The Master Algorithm (Basic Books, 2015).

Seeking out artificial intelligence, finding statistics, learning about archery.  Low bias, low variance.  Via Pedro Domingos, The Master Algorithm (Basic Books, 2015).


"Nil desperandum..."

"Despair in no way," says Teucer (via Horace), to inspire continued journeys and self-discovery.  I take this to mean, "Don't worry, you'll finally master your shot sequence and raise your average six arrow end score into the low fifties."

  Teucer , William Hamo Thornycroft (British, 1850 - 1905)    The Huntington Library, Museum and Botanical Gardens

Teucer, William Hamo Thornycroft (British, 1850 - 1905) 

The Huntington Library, Museum and Botanical Gardens


 Catching up on my  Hawkeye backlog over sushi in the Inner Sunset.

Catching up on my  Hawkeye backlog over sushi in the Inner Sunset.


 Consulting with Yondu on how to improve my aim. (Although if it involves whistling then I'm out of luck.) And not sure what the deal is with Quill's arm.

Consulting with Yondu on how to improve my aim. (Although if it involves whistling then I'm out of luck.) And not sure what the deal is with Quill's arm.


In the professional quality assurance world we already known that being consistent is not great if you are only ever consistently bad.  Don't despair. Practice.


 And for your first lesson, release with three fingers, not four.

And for your first lesson, release with three fingers, not four.